Efficiency of using Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Main Article Content

Ye.S. Sirchak
V.I. Griga
O.I. Petrichko
Y.I. Рichkar

Abstract

Background. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes a spectrum of diseases, which are closely associated with metabolic risk factors. The purpose of the research was to determine the effect of comprehensive therapy using Bifidobacterium infantis (B.infantis) 35624 drug on the dynamics of depression manifestations in patients with NAFLD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Materials and methods. Fifty-six patients with NAFLD were examined. They were divided into 2 groups: the first group (n = 26) of patients received a combined probiotic for the correction of colon dysbiosis, the second group (n = 30) received B.іnfantis preparation. Central nervous system disorders were determined using the following neuropsychometric tests (Spielberg-Hanin Self-Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale). Results. Analysis of microbiological study of feces in the examined patients of both groups before treatment indicates pronounced changes in the quantitative and qualitative composition of intestinal microflora. In patients with NAFLD and T2DM, somatic pathology is accompanied by marked manifestations of depression, anxiety, self-doubt. The research demonstrated a significant decrease in the severity of depression and anxiety on the background of normalization of the microbial composition of the colon with long-term administration of B.infantis 35624 in patients with NAFLD and T2DM. Conclusions. In patients with NAFLD and T2DM, colon dysbiosis was detected, mainly degrees II (in 53.3–53.8 % of surveyed people) and I (in 30.0–30.8 % of individuals). Patients with NAFLD and T2DM are diagnosed with anxiety disorders, moderate manifestations of depression on the Spielberg-Hanin scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, and Toronto Alexithymia Scale, which requires correction. Course intake of B.infantis 35624 by patients with NAFLD and T2DM is an effective tool not only for the correction of colon dysbiosis, but also for the reduction of the manifestations of depression and anxiety in these patients.

Article Details

How to Cite
Sirchak, Y., Griga, V., Petrichko, O., & Рichkar Y. (2020). Efficiency of using Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. GASTROENTEROLOGY, 54(1), 8–17. https://doi.org/10.22141/2308-2097.54.1.2020.199136
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Original Researches

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